amaBooks

»Her letters read like conversations one might have over tea…
they connected me across continents and mountains and rivers.
They connected me through space and time.«
This September Sun by Bryony Rheam
Enter the name for this tabbed section: general
Please fill in the form below:
(Items labelled in blue are mandatory)
Please send me regular updates on amaBooks.
Enter the name for this tabbed section: submissions
Submission Guidelines
Before you consider sending any material to ’amaBooks, it is a good idea to look at our publications page to make sure that your work fits in with the sort of material we publish.
If you think your manuscript does fit in please fill in the contact form below – we do not accept hard copies.
The message should include a brief description of the work you are submitting and a brief account of your writing experience.
If you wish us to consider a novel, please attach the first two chapters and a synopsis of around 500 words covering the plot, characters and action.
When submitting poetry, please include two sample poems.
For short stories, please submit one short story.
All submissions should be in the form of Word documents.
Proofread any documents you send, correcting spelling and grammatical errors. Ensure the documents are neatly laid out and easy to read, and do not include any artwork at this stage.
Please indicate if you have sent the work to another publisher for consideration.
Please note that it may take several months before we respond to your submission. Unfortunately, as a small publisher, we are not in a position to give feedback on work submitted that we choose not to publish.

Please fill in the form below:
(Items labelled in blue are mandatory)
Please send me regular updates on amaBooks.
Choose File...
»It’s what we do. We wait for transport, for electricity, for rain, for slow-speed internet connections at dingy cyber-cafes in town where we check our mail to see if a nifty little website has found us a job in Dubai or a scholarship to an obscure foreign university, or anything really to get us out of here. And there is never anything, mind you, but you know how hope is. It never dies.«
Arrested Development by Sandisile Tshuma from 'Long Time Coming'